TAGGED ITEMS

NRK Recycling organized the Plastics Gone Circular Congress to bring together actors from citizens to members of parliament in a push to close the plastic loop, making plastic the standard in sustainable raw materials.
Plastic is an unbelievably versatile, low cost material. We can create new objects, goods and construction materials, and we can recycle it again and again and again. Whether you support closed-loop plastic recycling, or oppose it, this Congress is the place to be.

It’s no joke, and undeniable: plastic recycling is a vital link in a circular economy. And in today’s economy, we consume plastic like never before – when plastic could be the

Three weeks ago, architect Matthias Hollwich released his book ‘New Aging’. Being more or less a self-help guide to aging, the book provides tips for successful aging. What are the most useful lessons, and what tips are rather ridiculous? This installment forms part of our research journey into the relationship between aging populations and cities.

Turning 40, architect Matthias Hollwich of Hollwich Kushner Architecture (HWKN) realized that he may have already lived half of his life, and started to think about what the next 40

On a little island just off Amsterdam’s mainland, two neighborhoods exist: Java and KNSM. The WASTED Plastic Race brings them head-to-head in a 10-week recycling race. The goal is for each neighborhood to get as many households recycling their plastic waste as possible before the finish. Can they reach 100%?

JAVA + KNSM ISLAND COMMUNITIES RACE TO RECYCLE Racers start at the current local plastic recycling rate: 7.4% of households. During FabCity’s 10 weeks, they race 17 April through 26

FabCity is a self-sufficient micro-society emerging April through June 2016 to explore current solutions to tomorrow’s biggest urban challenges – like plastic waste. CITIES brings a not-to-be-missed 4-part inside look into plastic’s many possibilities.
FabCity is a self-sufficient micro-society, emerging April through June 2016 to explore current solutions to tomorrow’s biggest urban challenges – like plastic waste. CITIES brings a not-to-be-missed inside look into plastic’s grand potential.

A small island just off Amsterdam’s mainland is being transformed into a self-sufficient micro-society exploring the future of everyday living. It’s called FabCity – the cornerstone of the Europe by

Why do older adults want to ‘age in place’? And how can we facilitate it? This installment forms part of our research journey into the relationship between aging populations and cities.

In my first article of this research series, I introduced two central tenets in the field of aging studies: age-segregation and age-integration. In the articles that followed, we looked at

WASTED's Barbara Koole Exchanges Knowledge in Fabrication City Barcelona at Fabrica del Sol and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
Japan is at the forefront of population aging worldwide, closely followed by European countries and the USA. The largest aging challenges, however, are expected to take place in the developing world. What is going on in different parts of the world? And what are the responses to population aging? This instalment forms part of our research journey into the relationship between population aging and cities.

Population aging experiences different circumstances in different regions of the world, sided by varied responses to aging-related issues. Francesca Bettio & Janneke Plantenga’s study ‘Comparing Care Regimes in Europe’ (2008)

Active aging rhetoric is now widespread in policy as well as everyday life, presenting itself as a magic solution to issues relating to population aging. How did the concept of active aging emerge? And what does active aging really entail? This installment forms part of our research journey into the relationship between aging populations and cities.

Life-long learning as part of a more flexible arrangement of the life-course (Source: trbimg.com) To understand the emergence of active aging discourse and policy practice, we have to see it

This is the third installment of our research journey into the relationship between aging populations and cities. We introduce another three Young-Old retirement communities and see what they have in common. What can we pick up from these, sometimes absurd, retirement contexts? And do these cases help us find answers as to how to deal with population aging in cities?

In my last article, following architect Deane Simpson’s ‘Young-Old: Urban Utopias of an Aging Society’ (2015), we explored the world’s largest age-segregated community – The Villages of Florida, USA –

What is the relationship between aging populations and cities? How can we advance more innovative, age-inclusive cities as we face rapid demographic transitions? These questions form the foundation of CITIES’ research agenda.
© 2019 CITIES.
All rights reserved.
Make a donation to CITIES