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Book: ‘Second Nature Urban Agriculture’ Pushes for Food Productive Cities

Will cities of the future simply consume, or simultaneously and sustainably produce? ‘Second Nature Urban Agriculture’ offers an in-depth analysis sided with actions for designing sustainable urban agricultural infrastructure. Read more here.
by Mehdi Comeau

Second nature urban agriculture

Food security is no joke. And not just in the developed world. Sooner than you would like to think, projections for increasing, interlinked crises in climate, energy and food may appear in a city near you. With great challenges, however, come great opportunities. In this case, cities are a hotbed for mitigating and contributing to solutions, where innovation, hard work and significant redesign of both built and social environment is necessary.

Second Nature Urban Agriculture focuses on the built urban environment and food, pushing groundbreaking insights into the field of productive urban design. As the result of roughly 10 years of research, this book is the sequel to Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes (2005). In this second book, the experienced UK architects of Bohn&Viljoen produce thoughts, facts, visions and case studies from their own work, supported by contributions from relevant experts, to continue advancing productive and sustainable urban infrastructure.

The book most directly offers professionals in the fields of city-making resources to shape, build and think about urban space as ‘continuous productive urban landscapes’, or in perhaps simpler terms, productive, agriculturally integrated urban areas.  For professionals and interested individuals alike, the book’s visionary material is critical for any world citizen to learn, as it facilitates the realization of cities evolving from centers of consumption and food importing, to centers of continuous, sustainable and resilient production.

For more, view the book on Routledge here.

About the author

Mehdi Comeau

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